If You Get Yellow Fever, Thank A Litterer

It seems that a new mosquito-borne disease is coming our way every year these days. First, Dengue. Two years ago, Chikungunya. Last year, Zika. 

These are all still very much with us, awaiting the hatching of new mosquitos after their long dry season ‘dormancy’.  And now we have Yellow Fever waiting to advance on Grenada. Transmission is all-too-easy. A mosquito bites someone with Yellow Fever (here or abroad), then it bites someone else, and that someone else gets the disease. After

These are all still very much with us, awaiting the hatching of new mosquitos after their long dry season ‘dormancy’.  And now we have Yellow Fever waiting to advance on Grenada. Transmission is all-too-easy. A mosquito bites someone with Yellow Fever (here or abroad), then it bites someone else, and that someone else gets the disease. After that, it ‘goes viral’, in the literal sense.

The symptoms are in many cases familiar: the sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, joint and muscle pain, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, back pain, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weakness and dehydration. Most patients recover from this – not that it was enjoyable at the time.

Unfortunately, that is not always the end of the story. As with Zika, with its comparatively mild symptoms, Yellow Fever can pack a punch. Yellow Fever can lead to internal bleeding, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) and organ failure. This occurs in about 15% of patients, half of whom may die within 10-14 days.

It makes obvious sense to try to avoid contracting the disease, and the only way to do this is to avoid mosquitoes.

  • Clear Guttering
  • Cover Water Containers
  • Wear Light Clothing
  • Use Repellent.

And, it should be needless to say, but unfortunately, it is not: STOP giving mosquitoes free nurseries by dropping litter, which catches rainwater in which the mosquitoes breed. Easy, but the litter dropping has become a habit – as natural as breathing for some. Your humble Styrofoam cup or food container is not only toxic — not only does it take centuries to decompose (if it ever decomposes fully) — but it is free accommodation for the bringers of Yellow Fever.

If you, or someone close to you, gets Yellow Fever, thank a litterer.

Grenada Green Group

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