Clouden Continues his Advocacy for Medical Marijauna in Grenada

Attorney at Law Anselm Clouden

by Donella Hosten

A group of Grenadians, including Attorney-at-Law, Anselm Clouden, have laid out their position supporting and advocating for the legalisation of marijuana in Grenada for medical use and export.

During a press briefing held on Tuesday, 31 October 2017, Clouden shared some information disseminated by Niagara College and Global Mail in Canada. Clouden again made the plea for the marijuana to be legalised in Grenada.

Government to ‘licence growers [and] set aside 100 acres for experimental purposes.’ He mentioned the St George’s University’s Produce Lab, which he says can be used to undertake scientific research in relation to the quality of the product.

“It is incumbent on this government or any future government, to take a serious look at the economic benefits that would accrue to Grenada if we become a producing country for export of medical marijuana.” Clouden went as far to say that Grenada is said to have the second-best soil in the world, and this therefore means, ‘we can grow very potent weed for medicine and recreation.’

According to him, this ‘economic crop’ is almost accepted throughout the world and he believes that Grenadians have the opportune time now to look seriously into the economic benefits associated with its export.

With this in mind, Clouden implored upon the masses who will be exercising their civic rights at the upcoming elections, to find out from their representatives what their positions are on the legalisation of marijuana for medical purposes. He used the examples of someone who suffers from fits, and someone who undergoes chemotherapy, as 2 scenarios in which medical marijuana can be prescribed.

Clouden believes that the government has a duty to protect its citizens, and what better way to do so, than to look after their health. However, if the government leans to the side of legalisation of marijuana for export purposes, this means the laws would have to be amended to suit.

According to Clouden, it is undoubtedly true that ‘any substance that is being abused will lead to problems,’ hence his plea to licence certain farms, which will be controlled.

The herb, which contains Cannabidiol (CBD), remains illegal in a number of developing countries. However, in certain countries in North America, particularly Canada, it has been legalised for medicinal use, as the benefits have been proven scientifically.

Additionally, Niagara College in Canada is currently offering 2 scholarships for Grenadian students interested in learning the proper way to cultivate the herb, should they be interested.

The discussion locally and regionally about the legalisation of marijuana has been and continues to be highly debated. However, despite the scientific facts brought forward, many small island leaders remain sceptical.

Comment with your Email or Facebook login:

avatar

comments